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How to Plan Meaningful Content

How to Plan Meaningful Content

How to Plan Meaningful Content

The most difficult part of any social media continuous marketing strategy is to generate meaningful content. It can be daunting, but a content calendar is a great way to start.

Choose topics relevant to your business and plan the days that you'll write about each topic. Schedule staff to contribute because, ultimately, their skills and relationships with clients comprise the knowledge and capabilities of your business. It's also great to periodically reference industry related news, but be sure that you choose reliable sources.

Remember that it's important to keep your company's voice consistent, so all content should pass through your Community Manager before it's shared with the world.


Why do customers leave without saying goodbye?

Why do customers leave without saying goodbye?

Why do customers leave without saying goodbye?

It was fun while it lasted...

I talk to businesses worrying about customers posting negative feedback, but a customer can do something far worse: Leave, without even saying goodbye!

Don't rely on customer feedback to highlight problems...in reality customers are more likely to just move on if they encounter barriers to your offerings.

Case in point: A client recently created a promotion-code based offer on Facebook.

Plenty of followers claimed the offer, but no sales resulted...on investigation the code wasn't set-up properly, but nobody complained...they just didn't buy anything!

Tactic: There is a second powerful lesson here...many online systems behave differently according to login status: be sure to test everything is functioning properly from your customers perspective... on this later...


Five tactics to address negative customer feedback

Five tactics to address negative customer feedback

Five tactics to address negative customer feedback

With the emergence of social media, customers are becoming increasingly savvy about how to effectively focus the spotlight on poor customer service, products and other sub-standard business practices.

In today's competitive environment transparency and integrity are vital, so if you have skeletons in your closet, it's more important than ever to clean up your act.

If a customer exposes a legitimate issue with your customer service, your products or your other business practices (if only I had a dollar for every time that's happened to me over the last 25 years), these five tactics have proven highly effective in my experience:

1: The best and only policy is (and always has been) to respond honestly and quickly.

2: Respond directly to the feedback within the platform it was submitted, even if you plan to action the issue in other ways. For example, respond to comments posted on your Facebook wall with an answer on your Facebook wall, even if you plan to telephone the customer directly.

3: Be sure your response is polite and professional. It's a good idea to frame responses with the mindset that they might appear on the front page of a newspaper...as has happened to some operators who didn't consider this possibility.

4: Don't feel any obligation to be overly specific, but if possible provide a brief explanation of how or why the issue occurred and if relevant how you will address the issue in future, for example:
"We had a power outage that afternoon, which explains why our telephones were off-line. We're consulting with our provider to investigate options to mitigate this in future".

5: Regardless of whether the customer is entitled to any formal compensation under your terms of service or in respect to any warranty, consider how you would want to be responded to if you were in your customers position. Even a token offer of compensation can be a very powerful display of empathy, however, be sure any such offer cannot be misconstrued as patronising.